Social Studies Education

  • Refer to Social Studies Flow Chart
     
    400 – Honors 20th Century United States History

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 9 Required
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.10
    • Placement Criteria: See below
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Honors and Advanced Criteria: Recommended minimum final average of 83% in eighth grade Honors Social Studies. An eighth grade student not currently in honors who wishes to be a candidate for this course should attain a recommended minimum average of 92% in eighth grade social studies.
    • Course Description: This course will survey American history beginning in the 1920s, covering the Great Depression, the Second World War, the Cold War, postwar American culture & society, the Vietnam War, social and political upheaval of the 1970s, the Reagan Revolution, and ending with the 1990s and 2000s. The class will utilize enrichment activities and supplemental readings to develop critical reading and thinking skills. Historical research, analysis, debate, and writing are major components of this course.


    401 – 20th Century United States History

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 9 Required
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course Description: This course will survey American history beginning in the 1920s, covering the Great Depression, the Second World War, the Cold War, postwar American culture & society, the Vietnam War, social and political upheaval of the 1970s, the Reagan Revolution, and ending with the 1990s and 2000s. The class will utilize enrichment activities and supplemental readings to develop critical reading and thinking skills.


    403 – The Social Sciences

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 9-10 Pathways Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course Description: This course is a combination of the study of sociology and an investigation of careers in the Social Sciences. This course is a practical study of society in the United States. Students will take a broad look at society and the various factors that influence its development.  Comparisons will be made between American and other societies.  Students will analyze the effects of socialization, stratification, deviance and inequalities within a society. Various careers in the social services will be discussed throughout the course.

     

    404 – Pennsylvania History Elective

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 10-12
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course DescriptionThis course is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding and application for the history, geography, culture, and politics of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania as well as Lancaster County and the borough of Elizabethtown. Students will apply their cumulative knowledge of major events in US History from colonial America to the present-day to see how Pennsylvania and their local communities helped to directly or indirectly affect the development of the American story. Special emphasis will also be given to original historical research and project development through the use of primary and secondary source documents.

     

    405 – Contemporary Issues: Problems Facing Our Nation and World

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 10-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course Description:  This course is an introduction to contemporary problems facing our nation and will provide students with the opportunity to scrutinize contemporary problems on the local, county, state, and international levels. In doing so, students will examine, but not be confined to, economic, religious, social, political, and military events. In addition to focusing on current events, where applicable, in-depth research will be conducted to determine the historical causes for current situations. The Internet will be widely used as a source for obtaining immediate and historical information pertaining to current events.

     

    415 – Vietnam War Elective

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 10-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course DescriptionThis course will investigate and evaluate the many implications of one of the longest and most controversial conflicts in American history– the Vietnam War. The course will look at the roots of the Vietnam conflict through European colonization, Western economic imperialism of the 19th Century, politics of the Cold War, collective security, the influence of American foreign policy, and regional tensions. Students will also analyze media bias, social upheaval, the counterculture movement, and discuss ways in which the Vietnam War continues to influence America’s relationship with Vietnam and other countries well into the 21st Century.

     


    420 – Honors World History

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 10 Required
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.10
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Honors and Advanced Criteria: Recommended minimum final average of 83% in tenth grade honor social studies. A tenth grade student not currently in honors who wishes to be a candidate for this course should attain a recommended minimum average of 92% in tenth grade Social Studies.
    • Course Description: This course is designed to study the culture, society, history and current affairs in selected Eastern and Western Hemisphere countries, with special emphasis on the Middle East, Asia, Europe, Latin America and Africa. Political, economic, religious, historical, and cultural themes are stressed in these areas of study.  Students will also analyze the effects these areas have on the United States.  Students will examine, in-depth, supplemental readings, maps and other materials to develop critical thinking and analytical skills.  Cultural and historical research and writing are major components of the curriculum.


    421 – World History

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 10 Required
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course Description: This course is designed to survey culture and history as related to current affairs in five regions of the world: Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Political, economic, historical, religious and cultural themes are stressed in these areas of study. Students will also consider and analyze the present-day effects these themes have on the United States and the rest of the world.  The class will utilize supplemental readings and materials to develop critical reading and thinking skills.

     

    422 – Honors Government and Economics

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades:  11– See flow chart Appendix B
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.1
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: 85% passing grade from previous Honors social studies course or 92% from onlevel social students course
    • Course DescriptionThis course provides students with a deeper contextual understanding of the direct and indirect effects that government has on the everyday lives of citizens, what the rights of the American citizen, and each citizen’s responsibilities to local, state, and national governments. Students will examine the basic components of our national economy and what impacts those components have on government and everyday life. Other relevant topics included in this course are: elections/ voter registration process, United States foreign policy, and relevant social issues.

     


    423A – Government and Economics

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades:  11– See flow chart Appendix B
    • Required unless taking AP course 431A or 432
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course Description: This course provides students with experiences to study individual rights provided to them by the US Constitution and other prescribed laws. Students will deal with the direct and indirect effects that government has on their lives and the responsibility each citizen has to government on the local, state and national levels. Students will also examine the implications of a global economy on the local, state and national levels. Other relevant topics include elections and voter registration processes, United States foreign policy and social issues that concern young adults. (This course was previously offered under the title Principles of Democracy and Economics.)


    425A – National Socialism, the Holocaust, and World War II

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades:  11-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: 20th Century United States History or Equivalent
    • Course Description: This course will provide students with an in-depth study of the 20th century’s historical nucleus: the Second World War. Students will analyze the significance and implications of WWII-related events, policies, and individuals.  Additionally, students will evaluate decisions of policy-makers and military leaders through understanding cause-and-effect relationships and recurring historical themes.  Skills gained and themes learned from United States and World History courses will be revisited with greater depth and extension.


    437 - Psychology

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades:  11-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Daily for Semester
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.0
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course Description: This course will focus on individual behavior through the study of psychology.  Historical and current theories will be discussed concerning various topics, including: research methods, states of consciousness, learning, memory, intelligence, human development over the entire life span, personality, emotions, gender roles and psychological disorders and their treatments.  Other topics will include: the human brain and the nervous system, sensation and perception, stress and social interactions.


     
    ADVANCED PLACEMENT SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION COURSES
     

    419 – AP World History

    • I credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades:  10-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Every Other Day All Year
    • Pathway: None
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.20
    • Syllabus
    • Placement Criteria: Students are recommended to have achieved a 92% or better in an Honors History class prior to selecting AP World History. In addition, students must complete a writing assessment. 
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course Description: AP World History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university world history course. In AP World History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides five themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures.
    • To find colleges and universities that offer credit or placement for AP scores see www.collegeboard.org/apcreditpolicy

     

    431A – AP United States Government and Politics

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades:  11-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Every Other Day All Year
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.20
    • Syllabus
    • Placement Criteria: Summer Reading Requirement: A summer reading is required and will be assessed on the first day of class. The summer reading assessment grade will follow the student regardless of final Social Studies class placement.
    • Course Prerequisite: U.S. History II
    • Advanced Placement Criteria: Students taking 11th Honors World History or US History II Honors must have a final average of 92% or higher. Students who took AP United States History as juniors must have a final average of 85% or higher. Students wishing to take this course must obtain a teacher recommendation and complete a timed writing sample.
    • Course Description: This weighted college-level course is an in-depth study of the features and functions of the American political and economic systems as well as other comparative systems utilized in the world today. Students who choose this course will be expected to read a college-level textbook, participate in discussions on a regular basis and write essays and papers that will demonstrate analytical skills and knowledge of subject area content. Upon successful completion of this course students choosing to take the AP exam, who score a three or above may receive college credit from participating colleges and universities.
    • To find colleges and universities that offer credit or placement for AP scores see www.collegeboard.org/apcreditpolicy


    432 – AP United States History

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades: 11-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Every Other Day All Year
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.20
    • Syllabus
    • Placement Criteria: Summer Reading Requirement: A summer reading is required and will be assessed on the first day of class. The summer reading assessment grade will follow the student regardless of final Social Studies class placement.
    • Course Prerequisite: U.S. History II
    • Advanced Placement Criteria: Students taking 11th Honors World History or US History II Honors must have a final average of 92% or higher. Students who took AP United States Government and Politics as juniors must have a final average of 85% or higher. Students wishing to take this course must obtain a teacher recommendation and complete a timed writing sample.
    • Course Description: This weighted college-level course is an in-depth study of United States history from the Age of Exploration to the present. Students who choose this course will be expected to read a college-level U.S. history textbook, participate in discussions on a regular basis, and write essays and papers which will demonstrate analytical skills and knowledge of subject area content. Upon completion of this course, students choosing to take the AP exam, who score a three or above may receive college credit from participating colleges and universities.
    • To find colleges and universities that offer credit or placement for AP scores see www.collegeboard.org/apcreditpolicy


    433 – AP Macroeconomics

    • 1.0 Credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades:  11-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Every Other Day All Year
    • Pathway: Arts & Communication
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.20
    • Syllabus
    • Placement Criteria: None
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course Description: In a decade in which economics forces have challenged the American economy, students can prepare for the transforming world of globalization by mastering macroeconomic principles to assist them when financially navigating their adult years.  This college level course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics while gaining a familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, and the political goals of stabilization policies. This course will incorporate mathematical models, while providing keen insight on the economic challenges facing our nation. Upon completion of this course, students choosing to take the advanced placement exam, who score a three or above may receive college credit from participating colleges and universities.  Note: Students taking AP Macroeconomics are strongly encouraged to pair this course with AP United States Government and Politics.
    • To find colleges and universities that offer credit or placement for AP scores see www.collegeboard.org/apcreditpolicy

      

    435 – AP Psychology

    • I credit
    • Offered Every Year
    • Grades:  11-12 Elective
    • Meeting Schedule: Every Other Day For Semester
    • Pathway: None
    • Lab Fee: None
    • Weighting: 1.20
    • Syllabus
    • Placement Criteria:
    • Course Prerequisite: None
    • Course DescriptionThis course is designed to take an in-depth look at the design.  The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.

      This course will be offered as part of college in high school.