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    As part of the E-town History Department’s effort to get Honors students ready for AP exams and future college level classes, those who take an Honors course will be participating in quizzes specifically aimed at “document-based questions” or “DBQs” during the current semester. These quizzes challenge students to think critically of the course material, particularly primary source documents and images, and are a regular feature of all AP history classes. The introduction offered here will go a long way in helping to determine if students are ready for that next academic challenge for next year or for the next level.
     
     
    Primaryletters292929222  Mr. H's DBQ Breakdown ( *Spring 2014* )
     
     Primaryletters292929222 Mr H's DBQ Grading Rubric ( *Spring 2017* )
     
     
     
     
     DBQ Writing Tips & Overview

     
     
     
     
     
    HistoricalThinkers290282882  
     
    Writing Standard DBQ Essays
     
     
     
     
      HistoricalThinkers290282882
     
     
     
     
    New DBQ Rubric Overview
     
     
     
    Part I: Thesis Statements  -  Part II: Analysis & Evidence  -  Part III: Synthesis
     
     
     
      
     
     
     
     
    Discussion Board Space Overview
     
    The space and discussion section provided below is an area where students can chat, exchange experiences, or dialog on unique questions and experiences against the backdrop of our studies of World History. Often students will be presented with challenging and complex issues that will add to the rich experience of what history means to us and how it is something that is always changing, both in interpretation and study. All comments are reviewed by Mr. H prior to posting and all past and present Honors students (including those currently in AP classes) are encouraged to join the conversation.
     
     
     
     
    Have you ever posted on an online discussion board
    like this for a class prior to this semester?
     
    Before you do, read over the tips for "Discussion Board Etiquette" or "Netiquette"
    before advancing by clicking here
     
     
     
     
    Rubric for Discussion Board Postings: Postings will be assigned in advance on Mr H's Homework Checklist and will carry the same amount of points as a typical, weekly homework assignment. Students are encouraged to refer to the rubric below for posting guidance:

    10 points
    8 points
    6 points
    4 points
    1 point
     
     
    Insightful posting
    Makes connections to class content or docs
    Offers new insights / ideas
    Completed on time or prior to assigned due date
    No stylistic errors
    (grammar, spelling, etc.)
     
     
     
    Clear posting
    Satisfactory connections to class content or docs
    Offers limited insights / ideas
    Completed on time or prior to assigned due date
    1-2 stylistic errors
    (grammar, spelling, etc.)
     
     
     
    Clear posting, but w/ minor issues
    Limited connections to class content or docs
    Offers few insights / ideas
    Completed on time
    3-4 stylistic errors
    (grammar, spelling, etc.)
     
     
     
    Flawed posting
    Poor connections to class content or docs
    Offers almost no insights / ideas
    Completed on time
    5-6 stylistic errors
    (grammar, spelling, etc.)
     
     
     
    Poor posting
    No connections to class content or docs
    Offers no insights / ideas
    Completed late
    completed on time or late posting
    6-8 stylistic errors
    (grammar, spelling, etc.)
     
     
     
    DIRECTIONS: To comment on the Discussion Board posting, click the "comment" link at the bottom of the post and type your comments into the provided fields. When your finished click the "Submit Comment" button and your writing will be submitted to Mr. H for posting. Comments will often be posted live for all viewers to see within the next 12-24 hours, typically.
     

Mr H's BDQ Discussion Board:

  • 2018 Mock Election Foriegn Policy Debrief (DBQ Posting #3)

    Posted by Mr Huesken on 10/20/2018 2:00:00 AM

    Foreign Policy1018811

     

    Introduction:

    As the 12th Grade Government and Economics classes prepare to present their Mock Election simulation to the rest of the Etown High School community, we as a Honors World History class took our own look at some of this year’s candidates as it related to our studies of world history, US foreign policy, and global issues. Specifically, how does each of the major party candidates (Republican, Democratic, Third-Party, etc.) plan to address America’s foreign policy challenges around the globe and what advice would we offer as citizens (and students of world history) that might help them in this monumental task.

     

    Directions for Your Posting:
    After viewing these online stories, consider the following question(s) using good supports, background information from class, and intelligent arguments, and post your thoughts in a  and please also reply on at least one (1) other person's thoughts.
     

     

    • After opening the app, enter the assigned code when prompted (a86dffd9). You can also go to the discussion directly using this link (https://flipgrid.com/a86dffd9)

     

    • When prompted, enter the grid finally using your etownstudents.org account via the Google button provided.

     

    • If you already have the app on your phone from a previous class or are using a desktop computer with a camera, you can click the link / icon below and be directed to the site.

     

    • Create a personalized video using your mobile or electronic device (max. of 5 minutes) that addresses the following points:
      • Traditionally, US foreign policy has been a big focal point in US elections only during Presidential election. In your opinion, is US foreign policy only a topic that should be utilized and discussed for the benefit of voters every four years? Why or why not? Explain.
      • Based on your experiences during our two days of Mock Debates, did our student-candidates seem prepared to discuss foreign policy issues? What might this say about the real life candidates and their depth of foreign policy knowledge? Explain.
      • In your opinion, what do you think will be the most important foreign policy issue of the 2018 Midterm Elections and how might it impact both the vote in our area, our political leaders, and US foreign policy after the voting is over? Explain.

     

     

    Postings will not be accepted past the assigned due date unless otherwise stipulated. Refer to the rubric posted above for more grading information.
     
    When posting your replys to your peers, remember the posted "netiquettes" above. We want to stimulate debate and discussion, not hurt feelings and animosity
     
    Comments (0)
  • How Did The "Other Side" View Imperialism? (DBQ Posting #2)

    Posted by Mr Huesken on 10/13/2018 2:00:00 AM
    Imperialism202828822
     
    Introduction
    European imperialism came to dominate the latter half of the 19th Century, reintroducing several isolated societies of the world not only to European culture, but the major advances that European economics and technology had achieved during the Industrial Revolution. As a result of this period in world history, isolated areas of the world such as Japan and China are going to find their status as world powers in serious doubt and in need to catching up rapidly to the West while other areas of Asia Africa, and the South Pacific are going to find themselves attacked, conquered, and colonized by European and Western powers in search of new lands and resources to fuel their industrial growth. Along the way, new powers are going to be created, opinions and philosophies that would come to dominate the 19th and 20th Centuries would be developed, and the seeds of future conflicts in the 20th Century are going to be planted.
     
    PankraMishra292828822 While most modern historians tend to focus on the European or Western perspective of imperialism, there is a growing interest in scholarship to understand this influential period less from the point of view of the conquerers and more from the view of the conquered. One such writer who has attempted to find some voice for this growing vein of scholarship has been Indian writer and journalist Pankaj Mishra (seen to the right), who in 2012, wrote a work entitled From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia. Known more to Western audiences for his writings on travel and modern culture, Mishra wrote this particular work of non-fiction in the aftermath of another previous book. In 2006, Mishra has just completed and published Temptations of the West: How to be Modern in India, Pakistan and Beyond, which described his travels through Kashmir, India, Afghanistan, Tibet, Nepal, and other parts of South and Central Asia. Within this book he examined the pressures of Western-style modernity and prosperity on the region and how traditional values and history were now classing (in some cases violently) with desires of economic and cultural parody with the West, particularly the United States. It was this book that got Mishra thinking about where this desire to be "Western" came from and inevitably led him to write and publish From the Ruins of Empire in 2012, which he claimed continued the conversation started by Temptations of the West and asked the question, which he later included in an interview for a New York City newspaper, of how Asian societies could find a "place of dignity for oneself in a world culture created by the West, in which the West and its allies have already reserved the best positions for themselves." 
     
    While From the Ruins of Empire does not try to completely explain the historical mindset of Asia and the Middle East towards European imperialism today, it does try to show that some of the most influential changes of Asia societies in the 20th Century against Western dominance were not necessarily the ones led by faith-fired terrorists and thwarted peasants-turned-revolutionaries. Rather, the justifications for some of these monumental changes and shifts were rooted in the ideas and teachings of once renowned Asian intellectuals like Sayyid Jamal ad-Din al-Afghani of the Ottoman Empire, Liang Qichao from China, and Rabindranath Tagore from India. These learned men were providing their fellow countrymen with a sense of how they saw their European conquerors and provides an insight into what these men had learned from being dominated by Europe. They were also looking for a way for their societies, once world powers themselves, to rise to prominence once again in a new and technologically different world. In 2015, author and amateur historian John Green decided to make Mishra's book the subject of one of his popular YouTube Crash Course series videos. That discussion is included below, as part of his series Crash Course World History II:
     
     
     
    Directions for Your Posting:
    After viewing these online stories, consider the following question(s) using good supports, background information from class, and intelligent arguments, and post your thoughts in a  and please also reply on at least one (1) other person's thoughts.
     

     

    • After opening the app, enter the assigned code when prompted (e16b40e9). You can also go to the discussion directly using this link (https://flipgrid.com/e16b40e9)

     

    • When prompted, enter the grid finally using your etownstudents.org account via the Google button provided.

     

    • If you already have the app on your phone from a previous class or are using a desktop computer with a camera, you can click the link / icon below and be directed to the site.

     

    • Create a personalized video using your mobile or electronic device (max. of 5 minutes) that addresses the following points:
      • According to Green, intellectuals of the Far East debated a number of reasons or theories as to why Europe had become so powerful and offered ideas of reform. Based on this critique, from your perspective which rational seems the more fitting or historical accurate and would most benefit Asian societies trying to regain their past dominance? Arguments presented by Asian thinkers that the key to Europe's power was its cultural and industrial traditions of military and educational might? Or was it the arguments for Europe's renewed burst of industrial influence that built stronger and more effective governments and societies? Explain your response.
      • Within his video lecture, Green keeps coming back to the idea of how religious traditions could be used to justify reform or challenges to Western dominance and how strong leaders could most benefit Asian societies rather than Enlighten democracy. In your opinion, is this foreshadowing of future world events? Or a strange coincidence? Explain. 
      • Finally, Green concludes his lecture with a discussion of how when we look at 19th Century European imperialism, historians often look at how Far East societies attempted reforms, but ultimately failed to achieve lasting change. In your opinion, do you think it is fair to look at Asia's response to European imperialism as a continent not yet ready or willing to accept Western-versions of civics or economics that would have set them in a more modern footing or did European imperialism provide Asia with the catalyst it needed to start moving in the right direction that would eventually led us to our modern world? Explain your response.

     

    Postings will not be accepted past the assigned due date unless otherwise stipulated. Refer to the rubric posted above for more grading information.
     
    When posting your replys to your peers, remember the posted "netiquettes" above. We want to stimulate debate and discussion, not hurt feelings and animosity
     
    Comments (0)
  • The Lessons of Frankenstein: 200 Years Later (DBQ Posting #1)

    Posted by Mr Huesken on 9/14/2018 2:00:00 AM

    Image result for Frankenstein

     

    We all know the story...a terrifying monster, a scientist with a misguided dream, and the world's first gothic novel...all from the mind of an 18-year old girl who wrote this classic story on a bit of dare. Mary Shelley probably never dreamed that her story of the Frankenstein monster would continue to be so iconic two centuries after it was originally published, but her work holds not just a great horror story, but an analogy for a time in world history when society was changing and some wondered how far the role of "industrialization" or technology would go into our everyday lives. Take a look at the video provided below from Crash Course: Liturature, with author and amature historian John Green, to see more on the liturary and historical impact of Frankenstein...


     

    Your Task:
    After taking a look at the video above, read the following article from Upfront Magazine entitled "Frankenstein: 200 Years Later" and respond in the comment section of this post to the following questions. 
     
    Directions for Your Posting:
    After viewing these online stories, consider the following question(s) using good supports, background information from class, and intelligent arguments and please also comment / reply on at least one (1) other person's thoughts. To post, just click the "Comment" button at the bottom of the page. When you do, the post will refresh. Scroll to the bottom of the page and post your thoughts in the space provided completed with name and email address. Make sure your post is at least 4-5 sentences in length, in paragraph form, and that you explain your answer. Postings will not be accepted past the assigned due date unless otherwise stipulated. Refer to the rubric posted above for more grading information. Please make sure that you include your name & email address with your post. No posts from "anonymous" will be accepted; postings should be made prior to the start of Homeroom on the morning of the due date; any posts made after the assigned due date will be considered late.
     
    When posting your replys to your peers, remember the posted "netiquettes" above. We want to stimulate debate and discussion, not hurt feelings and animosity
     

    1)  What was the impatus for the creation of Frankenstein as a novel and how, in a way, was a it a windown into the tortured, but young life, of its creator, Mary Shelley? Explain.

     

    2) According to the article, how is Frankenstein an interesting "cautionary tale" of the Industrial Revolution with the worlds of technology and humanity clashing both in the 19th Century? How might this same "cautionary tale" be applied to today's world? Explain.

     

    3) Compare and contrast this historical example with what we looked at in class already with Andrew Ure's The Philosophy of the Manufacturer. What are the similarities? Differences? Do Ure and Shelley share any common points or thoughts of the way the world is changing during the mid-19th Century and do they share similar outlooks for the Industrial Revolution? What original observations (if any) can you provide to this prompt? Explain.

     

    Comments (35)
  • What Kind of Student of History Are You? (DBQ Posting #1)

    Posted by Mr Huesken on 8/21/2017 2:00:00 AM
    DiscussionB129028282
     
    As a beginning to our discussion of world history, consider the following ideas below as a way to introduce yourself, your past experiences with Honors history classes here at the High School, and what skills you are already bringing to our class for th coming semester when it comes to DBQ writing. To further enhance this introductory discussion, we will be using the video discussion app, Flipgrid, to post a video introction of ourselves. Please follow the following instructions:
     

     

    • After opening the app, enter the assigned code when prompted (9e76bf). You can also go to the discussion directly using this link (https://flipgrid.com/9e76bf)

     

    • When prompted, enter the grid finally using your etownstudents.org account via the Google button provided.

     

    • If you already have the app on your phone from a previous class or are using a desktop computer with a camera, you can click the link / icon below and be directed to the site.

     

    • Create a personalized video using your mobile or electronic device (min. of 30 seconds / max of 1 minutes & 30 seconds) that addresses the following points:
      • Introduce yourself (Hi...my name is Jill Smith and I'm a senior at Elizabethtown Area High School)
      • What has your experience in your past history or honors history classes been like? Do you enjoy history as a subject? If so, why? If not, why? Explain.
      • What part of the world / area of world history are you most interested in / excited to learn about / concerned about? Why? Explain.
      • Have you ever done a Document-Based Question (DBQ) in any of your other classes - history or otherwise? If so, what class and with what teacher and what was your experience like with it? Good? Bad? Explain why. If you have never done a DBQ before, what have your peers said about this testing method? Easy? Difficult? How do you feel you would do when faced with this type of a challenge for the first time? Explain your answer.
      • What is the biggest challenge or apprehension you have going into this course? Its a bit different from your past American history classes, but what excites you? What gives you pause? What are you looking forward to learning more about as we go forward? Why? Explain.

     

    Videos will be automadically shared with Mr H. No posts from "anonymous" will be accepted; postings should be made prior to the assigned due date posted on the Google Classroom; any posts made after the assigned due date will be considered late.
     
    Comments (0)